Bibliography: Russia (page 117 of 140)

This annotated bibliography is curated specifically for the Russia is NOT the Enemy website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include SUETTA B. STORY, Edro I. Signori, Almuth Desautels, Ray E. Weisenborn, Washington National Education Association, Jane Yolen, John F. Kozak, Edward Stankiewicz, Daniel P. Resnick, and June Berkley.

STORY, SUETTA B. (1966). DOES JOHNNY KNOW MORE WORDS THAN IVAN. THE PUPILS IN A FIRST-GRADE CLASS IN MESA, ARIZONA, MADE THEIR OWN ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE WORDS THEY COULD READ WHICH WERE NOT IN THE BASAL READERS. THE LIST TOTALED 2,124 WORDS. NOT EVERY CHILD KNEW ALL THE WORDS, BUT SOME KNEW ALL, AND ALL KNEW SOME. THE STUDY IS PRESENTED AS AN ANSWER TO THE STATEMENT BY PROFESSOR ARTHUR S. TRACE, JR., THAT RUSSIAN CHILDREN READ BETTER THAN AMERICAN CHILDREN. METHODS OF READING INSTRUCTION IN RUSSIA AND AMERICA ARE OUTLINED BRIEFLY. IT IS NOTED THAT TYPICAL AMERICAN CHILDREN KNOW MORE THAN 2,124 WORDS AT THE END OF FIRST GRADE WHEN THEY ARE 6 TO 7 YEARS OLD. RUSSIAN CHILDREN AT AGE 7 ARE JUST STARTING SCHOOL. THIS ARTICLE APPEARED IN "THE READING TEACHER," VOLUME 20, NOVEMBER 1966. Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Reading Achievement, Reading Instruction, Reading Research

Piechowski, Marjorie (1967). Teaching World Literature at the High School Level. Selections from world literature can increase high school students' interest in reading, their familiarity with age-old literary themes, their understanding of literary genres, their awareness of varying cultures, and their skill in analyzing and writing about literature. A world literature course with those aims introduced in a small Wisconsin high school focused on plays and novels dating from classical Greek literature to the present and including literature from Greece, England, Spain, France, Russia, Norway, and Italy. Because the class was composed of an exceptionally able group of students, methods of teaching included lectures, panel discussions, class discussions, students' reports, and student research papers. Full-length films, filmstrips, drama recordings, musical compositions, art slides, and theater productions provided supplementary material. Solicited student comments indicated varying levels of enthusiasm for the course.   [More]  Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Classical Literature, Comedy, Drama

Resnick, Daniel P., Ed. (1983). Literacy in Historical Perspective. The result of a conference bringing historians and educators together with government officials to learn about current literacy research and to discuss research needs, this book presents eight conference papers. Topics covered include (1) the spread of literacy, (2) the impact of the printing press on current attitudes toward literacy, (3) the cultural context for literacy in seventeenth-century England and New England, (4) the relationship between literacy and traditional culture in England between 1600 and 1850, (5) the position of the illiterate person in the nineteenth-century American court system, (6) functional literacy in nineteenth-century China, (7) schooling and literacy in late Imperial Russia, (8) discriminatory assessments of black literacy, and (9) significant readings on literacy.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Literacy, Cultural Context, Cultural Influences, Educational History

Kozak, John F.; Signori, Edro I. (1976). Cross-Cultural Observations on Aging. This paper examined the social function of the elderly in various countries including Nigeria, Thailand, Ireland, Russia, Israel, Japan and the U.S.A. It was determined that the status enjoyed by the elderly of these cultures may have been related to the degree of dependency the younger population expressed toward the elderly. The dependency itself appeared to be the result of how much control, direct or otherwise, the elderly had within their own culture. Variables such as cultural emphasis on productivity, and economic, social, and religious independence of the young from the elderly were believed to be some of the major factors involved in the reduction of the status of the elderly, which is explained as not resulting merely from modernization itself. Descriptors: Age, Anthropology, Behavior Patterns, Cross Cultural Studies

Opravilova, Eva, Ed. (1989). Preschool Education: Selective Bibliography of 1988. Information Bulletin. A total of 577 annotated citations of materials concerning preschool education and related topics are provided in this selective bibliography of the 1988 literature from Austria, Czechoslovakia, Russia, Canada, France, Sweden, Hungary, Germany, Bulgaria, Poland, and Switzerland. Sections of the bibliography provide references to materials on: (1) social and ideological foundations of preschool education; (2) theoretical foundations of preschool education; (3) organization of preschool education; (4) educators of preschool children; (5) play; (6) preschool teaching; (7) health care and physical education; (8) social and emotional development and moral education; (9) speech and language education; (10) intellectual development and intellectual education; (11) aesthetic education; (12) education of children with special needs; (13) environmental education; and (14) the child's environment. Titles are in the language of origin with English translations. Annotations are in English. Descriptors: Aesthetic Education, Annotated Bibliographies, Child Health, Cognitive Development

Berkley, June, Ed. (1982). Global Education, Focus: Teaching English Language Arts. The articles in this collection deal with various methods of global education–education to prepare students to function as understanding and informed citizens of the world. Topics discussed in the 26 articles include: (1) the necessity of global education; (2) global education in the elementary school language arts curriculum; (3) science fiction and global education; (4) student exchange programs as a means of promoting cultural awareness; (5) global education emphasizing Russia; (6) creating a global education curriculum; (7) using an international fair to bring other cultures into the classroom; (8) self-consciousness and planetary consciousness; (9) the World Court; (10) the inspirational, educational values of international arts festivals; (11) lessons to be learned from the internment in the United States of Japanese-Americans during World War II; (12) foreign language study; (13) the expansion of the National Council of Teachers of English to a worldwide organization; and (14) creating global awareness through genealogy education. Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies, Cultural Awareness, Current Events, Curriculum Development

Yolen, Jane, Ed. (1992). Street Rhymes around the World. Based on the idea that although children of every nation speak different languages the language of play is international, this collection of 32 street rhymes from 17 nations and republics offers each rhyme in its native language (Portuguese, Tamil, Hebrew, Japanese, Russian, Chinese, Spanish, Greek, German, Bantu (Mambwe), Danish, Cheyenne, French, Armenian, Dutch) along with a translation in English. Illustrations in the collection are from artists native to the countries represented and portray children in song and in play. Most of the rhymes in the collection are traditional and have been handed down from generation to generation of children. Rhymes are from the following countries: France, Germany, Mexico, Greece, India, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Republic of Russia, the United States, Native America/Cheyenne, Republic of Armenia, Brazil, Zambia, People's Republic of China, Denmark, and England.   [More]  Descriptors: Childhood Interests, Childrens Literature, Cultural Context, Foreign Countries

Stoddard, Richard (1978). Theatre and Cinema Architecture: A Guide to Information Sources. This annotated bibliography cites works related to theatres, movie houses, opera houses, and dance facilities. It is divided into three parts: general references, theatre architecture, and cinema architecture. The part on general references includes bibliographies and periodicals. The second and main part of the guide, on theatre architecture, contains chapters devoted to general studies (broad or international in scope), classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Russia and the Soviet Union, the United States, and other countries. Chapter subsections cover general histories, the Renaissance and Baroque periods, the Restoration and eighteenth century, and the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The third part of the guide provides chapters relating to the cinema architecture of France, Germany, Great Britain, the United States, and other countries. Four indexes complete the guide: authors; architects, designers, consultants, and decorators; theatres and cinemas (listed geographically); and subjects. Descriptors: Annotated Bibliographies, Architecture, Arts Centers, Auditoriums

Stoddard, Richard (1977). Stage Scenery, Machinery, and Lighting: A Guide to Information Sources. This annotated bibliography traces the status of stage scenery and lighting, throughout the world, from the classical Greek theatre to the theatre of the 1970s, and includes references to available books, articles, pamphlets, some exhibition catalogs, and a few newspaper articles. Part one lists general references, including bibliographies and iconographies, dictionaries and encyclopedias, and periodicals. Part two contains chapters on scenery and stage machinery in the following countries: classical Greece and Rome, medieval Europe, Czechoslovakia, England, France, Germany and Austria, Italy, Russia and the Soviet Union, Switzerland, the United States, and other countries. References to general histories and to manuals, textbooks, and periodical articles on contemporary practice are included. Part three considers stage lighting and projected scenery before 1900, from 1900 to 1950, and after 1950 and cites general histories, manuals, and textbooks of contemporary practice. Author, subject, and person (as sujbect) indexes are also included. Descriptors: Annotated Bibliographies, Design, Drama, Dramatics

Weisenborn, Ray E. (1973). Intercultural Definition and Communication Design: Propaganda and Agitation. The research on intercultural communication design illustrates that definitions of propaganda and agitation can be altered if there is a change from an open to a closed culture, or vice versa. Russia and East Germany serve as examples of closed cultures, and the United States is employed on a comparative basis as an open culture. To enhance open culture understanding of the terms propaganda and agitation, the research delineates their closed culture functions. A communication design of the concept of feedback in specific closed culture propaganda and agitation is presented to illustrate intercultural concepts and functions. The design also serves to exhibit the intercultural effect of lack of information, definition confusion, and misconceptions of function. The research stresses that if there is little or no analysis of divergent communication functions and awareness of cultural definition, intercultural understanding may be thwarted and research stymied.   [More]  Descriptors: Communication (Thought Transfer), Cross Cultural Studies, Cultural Influences, Definitions

Beutler, Lawrence J. (1988). Environmental Education: Making the Future More Promising, Curriculum Report. Environmental education is generally thought to be an approach to teaching and learning that will help students develop the knowledge, skills, and values basic to environmental problem solving. This report addresses the need for environmental education and attempts to clarify definitions of some of the efforts such as outdoor education and conservation that have served as forerunners of environmental education. It includes a copy of the conference declaration of the world's first intergovernmental conference on environmental education which was held in Tbilisi, Russia, in 1977. Five basic objectives for environmental education are discussed, along with the need to infuse environmental education into the K-12 curriculum. Included is a set of seven short case studies of exemplary environmental education programs along with a list of resource materials on the subject. Descriptors: Case Studies, Conservation Education, Conservation (Environment), Elementary School Science

National Education Association, Washington, DC. (1975). Source Book for Speakers and Writers; Our Future Is in Our Schools. This source book provides some authoritative statements, striking phrases, relevant statistics, and collections of figures on educational topics for people preparing speeches or articles. The topics examined include citizen and school responsibility for the future of education; sources and inadequacies of school financial support; cooperative community, student, and teacher planning of curriculum; and teacher accountability. Also included are the results of a Teacher Opinion Poll conducted in 1973 studying teacher reactions to basic school programs, student violence, and class size. A final section briefly describes educational research on the topics of examination hysteria, sex role uncertainty, behavior modification, commitment to environmental improvement, classroom recitation, student attitudes, parents and television watching, the integration of retarded children in regular classes, college enrollment, early schooling in Russia, school survival, sex role typing, and teacher image.   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Citizen Participation, Curriculum Development, Educational Finance

Stankiewicz, Edward; And Others (1968). Russian Dialect Project. Volume III: Bibliography of Russian Dialect Studies. Preliminary Version. Final Report. Volume 3 of the Russian Dialect Studies is a bibliography listing Russian dialect studies published in the 19th and 20th centuries in Russia and abroad. The selection has been oriented primarily toward phonological and morphological studies of the dialects, and secondarily toward lexical, syntactic, and other studies. The bibliography is also intended as a reference book for the first volume, which is exclusively phonological and morphological. The approximately 1600 references are listed under the following categories: general studies, maps and atlases, chrestomathies, reports and summaries, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicology and onomastics, historical studies, literary language and dialects, dialect diffusion, regional studies, and bibliographies. An author index is included. For related volumes, see FL 002 758 and FL 002 759.   [More]  Descriptors: Bibliographies, Diachronic Linguistics, Dialect Studies, Instructional Materials

Desautels, Almuth, Comp. (1975). Archaeology: A Student's Guide to Reference Sources. This bibliography lists reference sources for research in archaeology. It is arranged in sections by type of reference source with subsections for general works and works covering specific areas. Categorized are handbooks; directories, biographies, and museums; encyclopedias; dictionaries; atlases; guides, manuals, and surveys; bibliographies; and bibliographies of periodicals. Subsections refer to countries or areas such as America, China, France, Germany, Egypt, Greece, The Orient, Rome, Great Britain and Ireland, Mesopotamia, and Russia. All the entries contain annotations which offer information on contents and format of the document. Because some multivolume works that are published over a long period are confusing and difficult to use, special mention of indexes and tables of contents is made. Entries are listed alphabetically by author or source within each section.   [More]  Descriptors: Annotated Bibliographies, Archaeology, Atlases, Bibliographies

Souto, H. Mario Raimondo (1969). The Technique of the Motion Picture Camera. Revised Edition. Aimed at the professional but useful to others, this book provides comparative material on virtually all the motion picture cameras available from manufacturers in the United States, Britain, France, Russia, Japan, and other countries. Information is provided on camera design and on the operation and maintainance of individual models. An analysis of the basic components of a camera is followed by an exhaustive survey of 35 millimeter cameras grouped under such headings as studio, field, and sound-on-film cameras. Narrow-gauge cameras, like 16 mm. ones used in television filming, are also covered, as are cameras designed for special uses, such as high-speed work, stop-motion, animation, special effects, cineradiology, kinescopic recording, and underwater work. Guidance is also offered on techniques of filming, including hand-hold shooting, zooming, and the use of the many devices recently developed for stabilizing cameras mounted in airplanes and helicopters. Descriptors: Animation, Equipment Maintenance, Equipment Utilization, Film Production

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