Bibliography: Russia (page 119 of 140)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized for the Russia is NOT the Enemy website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Fred Wilt, PJ Karr-Kidwell, Matthew G. Maetozo, Pieter Span, John N. Hawkins, PA. West Chester School District, Ministry of Education (Singapore), Jon Maksik, The Hague (Netherlands). International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, and Pittsburgh Carnegie-Mellon Univ.

Hawkins, John N.; Maksik, Jon (1976). Teacher's Resource Handbook for Russian and East European Studies: An Annotated Bibliography of Curriculum Materials, Preschool through Grade Twelve. This handbook is an annotated bibliography of 633 instructional materials for teaching about Russia and East Europe. Existing materials are identified that can be used by precollegiate teachers of all subject areas. The handbook is arranged by grade levels–preschool and kindergarten, elementary, junior high school, junior and senior high school. senior high school, advanced and nongraded. Within each section, materials are divided by the two regions and listed alphabetically according to their instructional formats. Types of materials include films, books, records and tapes, filmstrips and slides, maps and transparencies, posters and pictures, and multimedia. Entries contain title, date, description, price, and publisher. Some annotations provide an evaluation of the material's cross-cultural instructional value. A list of publishers and distributors is included for ordering materials. The handbook concludes with two model evaluation forms which may assist teachers in selecting materials on the basis of their cross-cultural value and for purposes of general assessments.   [More]  Descriptors: Annotated Bibliographies, Area Studies, Audiodisc Recordings, Books

MILDENBERGER, KENNETH W.; AND OTHERS (1960). FOREIGN LANGUAGES IN SOVIET SCHOOLS. THREE UNITED STATES SPECIALISTS IN TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES SPENT 23 DAYS IN RUSSIA TO LEARN ABOUT WHAT SOVIET SCHOOLS ARE DOING IN THAT FIELD. THEIR REPORT HERE IS BASED ON INTERVIEWS WITH 120 SOVIET EDUCATORS AND VISITS TO 29 EDUCATIONAL AND RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS. REFORMS INITIATED BY THE SOVIET MINISTRY OF EDUCATION IN 1957 ARE BEING CARRIED OUT, AND CERTAIN REVISIONS IN MATERIALS AND METHODS ARE ALREADY IN OPERATION. INCLUDED HERE ARE THE SPECIALISTS' OBSERVATIONS ON THE COMPETENCY OF TEACHERS OF ENGLISH, THE RESULTS OF TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMS, ENROLLMENTS IN ENGLISH COURSES, TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS (MOST OF WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN ADAPTED SUCCESSFULLY TO THE NEW TEACHING METHODS), A LACK OF INSTRUCTION IN CULTURE, AND LANGUAGE LABORATORIES. THIS ARTICLE IS A REPRINT FROM "SCHOOL LIFE," OCTOBER 1960.   [More]  Descriptors: Comparative Education, Educational Innovation, English (Second Language), FLES

Maetozo, Matthew G. (1978). Physical Education and Sport in the Soviet Union. The author presents perceptions of the world of sport and physical education gained during a study-tour of the Soviet Union in 1977. This broad overview of individual and governmental involvement in physical activities includes the following–a survey of physical education and public participation in sport in tsarist Russia, governmental policy immediately following the October Revolution, physical education requirements and general goals in the school system, the "pioneer club" facilities for youth, sport societies for workers, professional preparation for teachers and sport specialists, research efforts at the Central Institute of Physical Culture of the Order of Lenin (including a curriculum profile), and other research laboratories for physical culture and sport.  Descriptors: Curriculum, Foreign Countries, Government Role, National Surveys

Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. (1968). African South of the Sahara: An Objective Test for Secondary Schools. A World Regions Perception Survey. Designed by Project Africa of Carnegie-Mellon University, these two test instruments have been used to discover what selected American secondary school students know or believe about Africa and other regions of the world. The first instrument, a 30-minute objective test, "Africa South of the Sahara," is comprised of 60 multiple-choice and matching questions. An answer key is provided. The second test, "A World Regions Perception Survey," asks students to match 90 selected vocabulary terms with any of seven regions of the world–North America, South America, Europe, Russia, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa south of the Sahara. A world map and directions for administration of both tests are included. (See ED 023 692 and ED 023 693 for the reports of the projects in which these tests were used.)   [More]  Descriptors: African Culture, Attitude Measures, Cultural Awareness, Diagnostic Tests

Friedman, Adele C. (1977). Strangers in Paradise: The Life and Literature of Foreign-Born Women in California. This paper presents student research from a class project on the Life and Literature of Foreign-Born Women in California. It examines the role of these women in agriculture, the arts, and political and economic life. Specific accounts of women from Russia, Poland, France, and Mexico are given. Others mentioned include those women born in America but with vast cultural disparity, the Black Creoles from Louisiana and the Native American. The researcher concludes that each women is an individual who has been shaped by her cultural tradition. Those women with the strongest or most content personalities are those who have maintained a cultural link with tradition. It is suggested that these women can serve to teach others from their experiences. Descriptors: Females, Feminism, Foreign Culture, History

Wilt, Fred, Ed. (1972). The Jumps: Contemporary Theory, Technique and Training. This collection of essays offers a cross section of modern theory and progress in the training of the four "jumping" events in track and field athletics–pole vault, high jump, long jump, and triple jump. It is written for athletic coaches in these specialties. Articles range from general and historical reviews of technique and training matters to contributions on single, specific, important aspects of a jumping event. Different shades of opinion and changes in theory are presented in articles written by experts in the field. Contributors include experts from the United States as well as foreign countries. Translated into English for the first time are papers from trainers and coaches from the following countries: India, Czechoslovakia, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Russia. Articles from writers in Britain, Canada, and Australia are also included. Descriptors: Athletes, Athletic Coaches, Educational Theories, Foreign Countries

Binnington, John P., Ed. (1967). Mutual Exchange in the Scientific Library and Technical Information Center Fields; A Report from the Special Libraries Association Delegation to the Soviet Union 1966. Articles included in this document are: (1) The Backgrounds of the Exchanges, by John P. Binnington, (2) Structure of the Soviet Scientific Information System, by Winifred Sewell, (3) Standards, Patents and Technical Reports, by Frank E. McKenna, (4) The Flow of Information to Users, by William S. Budington, (5) Research in Libraries and Information Centers, by Gordon E. Randall, (6) Education and Training, by Irma Johnson, and (7) Library Equipment and Tools, by Frank McKenna. A list of libraries and institutes visited by the Special Libraries Association Delegation to Soviet Russia, the itinerary of the Soviet Delegation, the members of both Delegations, and a list of courses used to raise the qualifications of technical, scientific and administrative personnel working in information fields at the All-Union Institute of Scientific and Technical Information and the USSR Academy of Science are appended. Descriptors: Exchange Programs, Information Centers, Information Dissemination, Information Systems

International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands). (1986). IFLA General Conference, 1986. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Section: Libraries for the Blind. Papers. Papers on libraries for the blind presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Report on 'Study on the Tools to Improve the Availability of Library Materials for the Blind'" (Winnie Vitzansky, Denmark); (2) "Planning the Third Edition of 'The International Directory of Libraries for the Blind'" (Edwige Mortyr, Norway); (3) "Library Services to Visually Handicapped in Norway" (Else Granheim and Ka-Jo Carlsen, Norway); (4) "Integration or Disintegration–The Services of Libraries for the Blind in the Netherlands" (J. M. J. Dister, Netherlands); (5) "Universal Availability of Publications and Special Format Materials" (Lorraine McQueen, Canada); and (6) "Library Programme of the Artistic-Aesthetical Education of the Blind Citizens of Russia" (D. S. Zharkov, USSR). Descriptors: Aesthetic Education, Audiodisks, Blindness, Braille

South Carolina Univ., Columbia. Center for the Study of the Freshman Year Experience. (1994). The First Year Experience. Conference Proceedings of the International Conference (7th, Dublin, Ireland, July 18-22, 1994). These proceedings contain 68 author-prepared abstracts of presentations given at the Seventh International Conference on the First-Year Experience, a 5-day conference that focused on the foundations for improving the undergraduate experience. The majority of the one- to two-page abstracts report on specific programs undertaken by colleges or universities to help students make the transition from secondary school to higher education, to improve the educational and extracurricular experiences of first-year college students, or to improve freshman retention. Other topics addressed include multicultural awareness, programs for disadvantaged students, program effectiveness and evaluation, and student employment. Programs from institutions in Canada, the United States, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Russia, and South Africa are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Abstracts, College Freshmen, College Programs, Cultural Awareness

Ministry of Education (Singapore). (1977). Singapore National Report. 36th Session of the International Conference on Education. Education in Singapore is centrally controlled by the Ministry of Education and is financed almost entirely by the government. Boys and girls have equal access to education, and most of the primary and secondary schools and junior colleges are coeducational. There is complete freedom of choice of language of instruction: Malay, Chinese, Tamil, or English. Channelling into practical courses is carried out at primary and secondary levels to enable less academically inclined pupils to become employable when they leave school. Since 1976, automatic promotion in primary school has been abolished. In its place there is now a system of regular grade level assessment for promotion or retention. Secondary education offers courses in technical, academic, and commercial fields. Teacher training requirements vary according to the level of teaching to be performed. Preservice training programs are required. Training abroad is available in Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Russia, England, and the United States. Descriptors: Comparative Education, Curriculum, Educational Administration, Educational Assessment

Gardner, Mary A. Ed. (1976). A Foreign Correspondent's View of the Electoral Process. According to their personal points of view regarding United States politics, a panel of foreign correspondents from other nations evaluated the United States electoral process and discussed the difficulties involved in conveying the complexities of this process to an audience. This document contains an edited transcript of the panel's comments. Moderated by Martin Agronsky of Washington, D.C., the panel consisted of correspondents from Japan, England, Russia, and Germany. The following topics were discussed: the realism of press coverage of political issues, the interrelationship of predictions and results in elections, personalities of candidates, Richard Nixon as a product of the electoral system, the effectiveness of political speeches, and a comparison of United States politics with that of the countries represented on the panel. Descriptors: Audiences, Comparative Analysis, Current Events, Elections

KVARACEUS, WILLIAM C. (1963). ALIENATED YOUTH HERE AND ABROAD. THIS ARTICLE DISCUSSES THE "SECOND-CLASS CITIZENSHIP" OF YOUTH FROM ALL SOCIAL CLASSES AND COUNTRIES, AND PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED STATES AND ABROAD WHICH PROVIDE YOUTH WITH A RESPONSIBLE, MEANINGFUL ROLE IN SOCIETY. IT IS FELT THAT IF SOCIETY FAILS TO CONSTRUCTIVELY TAP THE ENERGIES OF YOUTH, THEIR LATENT ENERGY AND SUBSEQUENT SOCIAL ALIENATION MAY BE CHANNELED INTO DELINQUENT ACTS. PURPOSEFUL PROGRAMS SUCH AS THE INTERNATIONAL YOUTH HOSTEL FEDERATION, THE PIONEERS AND KOMSONNOL YOUTH GROUPS IN RUSSIA, THE CITIZENSHIP IN ACTION PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS, AND SOME UNESCO PROGRAMS ACTIVELY CONTRIBUTE TO THE BETTERMENT OF SOCIETY. THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN THE "PHI DELTA KAPPAN," VOLUME 45, NUMBER 2, NOVEMBER 1963.   [More]  Descriptors: International Programs, Social Adjustment, Social Services, Student Alienation

Span, Pieter (1980). Re-Structuring as a Cognitive Task. Witkin's concepts of field dependence-independence and restructing are discussed with reference to studies in Russia and in the Netherlands. These concepts are related to differences in style of perception and to success on both cognitive tasks and social tasks. It is suggested that restructing abilities may be trained and restructing ability may influence different aspects of learning. An experiment is summarized in which subjects reported their introspections while working on embedded figures tasks. Russian studies of perception are discussed and it is suggested that perception develops through several stages or levels. A pilot study with 30 children is described, but it was concluded that the tasks that were set did not accurately represent the actual order of perceptual development in the children. A question is raised as to whether perceptual development as indicated by embedded figures tasks was really a single dimension of ability. The concept of individual differences and the concept of individuality are compared. Descriptors: Cognitive Development, Cognitive Measurement, Cognitive Processes, Cognitive Style

West Chester School District, PA. (). Cultures of the Western World. Grade Ten. Instructional Guide. This curriculum guide presents nine units for the study of western cultures in the tenth grade. The units contain up to 13 lessons each and comprise a two-semester course. Content includes ancient Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, Great Britain, France as a case study of revolution, Russia, and nationalism and the unification of Germany. For each lesson, information is presented on objectives, motivational activities, an outline of content, key words, and an evaluation activity. No instructional materials are identified. Activities involve students in defining terms, discussing relevant concepts in class, identifying time period and major characteristics of literature and art works, explaining how and why certain movements such as the Reformation arose in response to specific conditions, and drawing parallels between historic and current events. Descriptors: Ancient History, Course Content, Course Objectives, Cultural Education

Mayberry, Lupita; Karr-Kidwell, PJ (1981). Learning Styles: Their Effects on the Potential Development of the Brain. A review is presented of research findings on the operation and functions of the two hemispheres of the brain. In tracing discoveries on hemispheric specialization (the left processing information objectively, linguistically, and linearly; the right, spacially, intuitively, and creatively) the importance of achieving a balance between the differing abilities is pointed out. Examples are given of very early training of children in Russia, Uganda, and Japan which highlight the potential inherent in an environment which encourages the use of both brain hemispheres. It is suggested that given the fact that hemispheric asymmetry appears to be a common variation among children, curricula which address individual learning styles should be investigated. The feasibility of adjusting instruction to match cerebral dominance while incorporating activities for strengthening both hemispheres is discussed. Descriptors: Cerebral Dominance, Cognitive Style, Curriculum Development, Early Childhood Education

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