Bibliography: Russia (page 125 of 140)

This annotated bibliography is curated specifically for the Russia is NOT the Enemy website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Marian J. Krzyzowski, Dindy Robinson, Washington Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (Dept. of State), Constantina Safilios-Rothschild, Victor A. Smith, Alejandro Parellada, Brooklyn New York City Board of Education, Clyde C. Robinson, I. Smirnov, and JERZY R. KRZYZANOWSKI.

Parellada, Alejandro, Ed.; And Others (1994). The Indigenous World 1993-94 = El Mundo Indigena 1993-94. This book addresses the oppression and discrimination that indigenous populations face and discusses their efforts to regain basic rights to control their own cultural, economic, political, and social development. The first section discusses the social status and living conditions of indigenous populations in the Arctic (including Saamiland and Russia), North America, Mexico and Central America, South America, Melanesia, the Pacific and Australia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Africa. Each chapter describes the progress of indigenous populations in securing basic rights such as self-determination, self-government, cultural integrity, access to education, control over education and child welfare, and input into political and economic issues. Discussions also address the role of various governments in perpetuating the oppression of indigenous groups. The second section outlines articles of the draft declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples as agreed upon by members of the United Nations Working Group. This document was designed to provide states with an opportunity to make a Declaration of Intent that they will strive to improve the atrocious conditions in which many indigenous peoples live. This section also includes a report discussing suggestions of the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) for strengthening the rights of indigenous peoples and a report concerning indigenous peoples' right to use renewable resources for subsistance and how this right has been threatened by colonialism. Also included is a listing of IWGIA publications in English and Spanish. Descriptors: Access to Education, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Canada Natives

Krzyzowski, Marian J. (1994). Michigan Business Assistance Corps. Final Report. The Michigan Business Assistance Corps (MBA Corps) was established by the University of Michigan Business School in 1990 to assist emerging democracies in Eastern Europe in successfully negotiating the process of economic privatization, while at the same time providing Michigan Business School graduate students with a unique international experience. MBA students have served as consultants with companies in Poland and Russia, helping to establish accounting systems, develop marketing strategies, and other management tasks. The MBA Corps was supported by the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education from 1991-1994; 51 MBA consultants participated in the program. The MBA Corps has had significant positive impacts on its participants, including the student consultants, the host companies, and the Michigan Business School. The students gained increased understanding and respect for other cultures, a better understanding of the difficulties facing emerging economies, and career insights. The host companies have been enthusiastic and most have requested to continue serving as hosts for student consultants. The countries have also reported impacts on their public policy. (Five contain assessments of the program for the various constituent groups.)   [More]  Descriptors: Business Administration, Consultants, Consultation Programs, Foreign Countries

Robinson, Clyde C.; And Others (1996). Psychometric Support for a New Measure of Authoritative, Authoritarian, and Permissive Parenting Practices: Cross-Cultural Connections. This study examined the psychometric characteristics of a 62-item parenting questionnaire completed by parents from the United States, Australia, China, and Russia. Factor analyses yielded three global parenting dimensions for each culture which were consistent with D. Baumrind's (1971) authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive typologies. The global parenting dimensions were subsequently analyzed to assess their internal structures. For each of the three global dimensions, a number of specific parenting practice factors were identified and compared cross-culturally. The internal factors for the authoritative style were: (1) warmth and involvement; (2) reasoning/induction; (3) democratic participation; and (4) good natured/easy going. The factors for the authoritarian style were: (1) verbal hostility; (2) corporal punishment; (3) non-reasoning, punitive strategies; and (4) directiveness. The factors for the permissive style were: (1) follow through; (2) ignoring misbehavior; (3) and self-confidence. Quite similar parenting practice factors were found for authoritative parenting across cultures; for authoritarian and permissive styles there were substantial cross-cultural differences among the specific parenting practices. Factor scores of the global parenting styles and specific practices were correlated with preschool behavioral problem outcomes to assess the validity of the instrument's cross-cultural use. For the United States and Australian families, mother and father authoritativeness and authoritarianism were related to child preschool behavioral problem outcomes.   [More]  Descriptors: Authoritarianism, Child Development, Child Rearing, Classification

Smirnov, I.; And Others (1995). The Role of Technical and Vocational Education in the Education System of the Russian Federation. The deep economic and social problems associated with the Russian Federation's move to a market economy have extended to Vocational Education (VE). Nearly 50% of 1994's VE graduates could not get a job, and Russia's new constitution has thrown vocational schools into the market without any state support, thereby forcing many schools to become overly commercialized. In an attempt to remedy the situation, a new state standard has been adopted to serve as a model for VE that is based on the European system of five stages of VE. It is designed to prepare students for professions requiring three different levels of qualification. The new model views VE as an element of a system of interaction between the state, employers, and trade unions and gives vocational schools and regional educational authorities more independence. Unfortunately, the funds allocated to implement the new model are sufficient only to design the standards. The immediate challenge is to identify the priorities of VE in order to develop and implement needed reforms gradually enough to avoid drastic social consequences. (Contains 12 references. Appended are tables/facts about the following: development of VE in 1985-1994; VE students, graduates, and personnel; provisions of the state standard.)   [More]  Descriptors: Education Work Relationship, Educational Change, Educational Legislation, Educational Needs

Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (Dept. of State), Washington, DC. (1974). A Human Contribution to the Structure of Peace: International Educational and Cultural Exchange. This publication discusses and provides statistics on United States travel abroad and foreign travel to the United States. Contents include a discussion of the following: (1) trends in travel and exchange programs; (2) scope and relevance of U.S. exchanges; (3) cultural exchanges, programs, and travel between the West and Russia, Poland, Hungary, Romania, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, the People's Republic of China, and the Middle East; (4) programs involving foreign visitors who came to the United States to study the democratic process; (5) exchange programs aimed at fighting drug abuse; (6) environmental and urban projects; and (7) other nations' support for exchanges. Names, addresses, and descriptions of groups that provide exchange opportunities are provided. The tables in the appendices, which comprise half of the publication, contain statistics on exchange programs from 1949 to 1972. Included are numbers of both U.S. and foreign persons exchanged, origin or destination by area, kinds of exchange grants, and what the travelers taught or studied. Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies, Cultural Education, Cultural Exchange, Exchange Programs

Hummel, Charles (1977). Education Today for the World of Tomorrow. IBE Studies and Surveys in Comparative Education. The study investigated the educational practices, trends, problems, and achievements in the world today. Intended predominately for use by educational policy makers in both developed and developing nations, the booklet is also relevant for members of the public concerned with the future of education. The booklet is presented in five chapters. Chapter I describes philosophies which promoted recent educational reforms and presents case studies of innovative practices in New Zealand, Russia, Nigeria, and Algeria. Chapter II focuses on lifelong education in theory and practice. Topics discussed include background, objectives, and practices of continuing education in various nations, the role of mass media, and the campaign against illiteracy. Chapter III examines the global democratization of education, with particular consideration of participation by students in all phases of the educational system and of increasing access to higher education. Chapter IV investigates the relationship between education and society. Information is presented on economic development, disparities between industrialized and developing nations, work study programs, cultural transmission, and education in rural areas. The final chapter predicts trends in education, including increasing regional and international cooperation, individual participation, decentralization, and cultural development activities. Descriptors: Adult Education, Comparative Analysis, Comparative Education, Continuing Education

KRZYZANOWSKI, JERZY R. (1967). SOME PROBLEMS OF TEACHING RUSSIAN–PUSHKIN OR EVTUSHENKO. ALTHOUGH CAUTIOUS TRADITIONALISM, TEXT AVAILABILITY, LITERARY VALUE, AND PREFERRED LANGUAGE USAGE APPEAR TO FAVOR USING READING TEXTS BASED ON 19TH-CENTURY CLASSICS IN RUSSIAN LANGUAGE COURSES, AMERICAN STUDENTS, WHO IN THEIR CAREERS WILL NEED TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE CURRENT GENERATION IN RUSSIA, WILL FIND AN EXPOSURE TO MODERN READINGS MORE REWARDING. THE RELEASE OF SOME NEW TEXTS ON CONTEMPORARY LIFE HAS HELPED OVERCOME THE OBJECTIONS TO THE PREVIOUS COMMUNIST-SATURATED MODERN READING MATERIALS THAT WERE AVAILABLE. HOWEVER, THE MORE COMPLEX PROBLEM OF UNDERSTANDING THE DIVERSITY OF CONTEMPORARY SOVIET SOCIETY CAN BE HANDLED ONLY BY A WELL-PREPARED TEACHER WHO IS CAPABLE OF SELECTING, FOR CLASSROOM USE, APPROPRIATE VEHICLES OF THE CHANGING, OFTEN COLLOQUIALLY UNGRAMMATICAL LITERARY LANGUAGE, AND WHO CAN GUIDE HIS STUDENTS THROUGH THE MAZE OF TECHNICAL TERMS, NAMES, ABBREVIATIONS, AND INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROBLEMS INHERENT IN INVOLVEMENT WITH MODERN RUSSIAN. THIS PAPER WAS DELIVERED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY FOREIGN LANGUAGE CONFERENCE (20TH, LEXINGTON, APRIL 28-29, 1967).   [More]  Descriptors: College Language Programs, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Context, Culture Contact

Vaughn, Harold A. (1969). The U.S. Student Movement: A Cross-Cultural and Historical Perspective. Whereas past campus revolts in America were concerned with on-campus issues, the present student movement is political, and must be understood as such. Much of the student unrest has resulted from the belief of students that the system is not truly representative and unjustly excludes them from the decision-making process; normal political processes are not functioning; and the democratic process is too slow in bringing about urgently needed reform. Max Frankel, George Kennan, Seymour Lipset, Lewis Feuer, Robert Hutchins, Margaret Mead, and Pitrim Soroken have offered various interpretations of the causes and implications of student unrest. American student unrest is comparable to 19th century student movements in Russia and Germany, and to more current movements in France and other countries. Placed in historical and cross-cultural perspective, the US student movement appears less radical, less violent, and less extreme. Much of the conflict in American universities has focused on the role of the university in society. As an institution, however, the university must undertake the resolution of problems directly related to its educational and parietal role, and must minimize sources of conflict that are social and political in nature. The university's future depends upon the way it meets these challenges.   [More]  Descriptors: Activism, Democratic Values, Higher Education, Political Attitudes

Fairfax County Schools, VA. (1970). Man in a Changing World. The sixth level of the social studies curriculum (Fairfax County Public Schools, Virginia), "Man in a Changing World," is designed to maintain a balance between the study of concepts and the development of inquiry skills. Emphasis is given to the role of individual man in several social settings, past and present, Western and non-Western. The content is drawn primarily from the disciplines of anthropology, history, and to a lesser extent, from economics, geography, sociology, and political science. The units developed in the guide are: 1) Man and Culture; 2) Man in the Classical World; 3) Man in the Medieval World; 4) Man and His Search for Freedom (England); 5) Three Modern Faces of Man: Africa South of the Sahara, Japan, Russia. The program utilizes multimedia materials to provide a variety of activities for all students and to prevent reading difficulty from being a stumbling block in achieving social studies objectives, including, records, transparencies, study prints, filmstrips, films, documents, and text and trade books.   [More]  Descriptors: Anthropology, Concept Teaching, Cross Cultural Studies, Curriculum Guides

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Bilingual Education. (1996). Russian/English Interdisciplinary Lessons for General Education and Special Education Students. Pre K-2. The materials consist of two thematic science and mathematics lessons at each of four instructional levels (pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, grade 1, grade 2) designed for use by both Russian bilingual and English-monolingual teachers in general and special education programs. The lesson themes and objectives correspond to learning and performance standards established for New York City (New York) public schools. Pre-kindergarten lesson topics include different types of animals that live in Russia and proficiency in using numerals from 1-6. Kindergarten-level lessons, on the theme of food, include a lesson in capacity and estimation and one on how heat changes food. First-grade lessons, on the theme of Matroyshka dolls, are on estimating the capacity of the dolls and on increasing and decreasing order. Second-grade lessons, on amber, address comparison and contrast (geometric shapes of amber) and its electrical properties. Each grade-level unit includes background information on the topic, behavioral objectives, key vocabulary, a list of materials needed, motivational ideas, procedures, extension activities, adaptations for special education students, a text, and illustration(s). The full text of each lesson and exercises is presented in both English and Russian.   [More]  Descriptors: Animals, Bilingual Education, Early Childhood Education, English (Second Language)

Glenny, Lyman (1971). Doctoral Planning for the 1970s, Research Reporter. The launching of Russia's sputnik in 1957 caused a reassessment of scientific manpower needs in the U.S. and drastic shortages of all types of highly trained specialists was predicted by 1970. This myth continued until the late 1960's when proposals were still being made to double federal aid for graduate students. Federal aid induced state colleges to embark upon advanced graduate work, and national production of doctorates almost tripled from 1958 to 1969–from 8,942 to 25,734. It is now obvious that in the foreseeable future the excess of doctorates over established needs will be substantial. Five closely interrelated problems are now facing public and private institutions and the states: (1) underwriting the costs; (2) reducing anticipated surplus production; (3) maintaining the quality of the degree; (4) changing the character of some doctoral degree training; and (5) absorbing surplus doctorate holders. There is a need for a careful assessment of basic needs, and a careful allocation of resources to meet them.   [More]  Descriptors: College Faculty, Doctoral Degrees, Financial Problems, Graduate Study

Smith, Victor A. (1979). A Factor Analytic Approach to Studying Changes in Student Attitudes Toward Other Nations. This paper describes a study to explore the impact of experimental social studies materials on student attitudes toward other nations. The experimental materials were developed as part of the Global Studies Project sponsored by the Social Studies Development Center at Indiana University. Designed for the junior high level, the materials focused on basic human phenomena such as food and communication which are parts of all cultures. The hypothesis of the study was that students using the experimental materials would show a change in international attitudes after the experimental period, whereas students in a control group, which did not use the materials, would show no attitude change. For the study 15 junior high classes in six states were each divided into control and experimental groups. All groups received pre- and posttests before and after 15 weeks. The test measured students' attitudes toward 15 nations including Mexico, Canada, India, Ghana, China, and Russia. Extensive factor analysis was performed on the data. Contrary to the hypothesis, students in the experimental groups did not show a change of attitude. This suggests that children's international attitudes are formed before the junior high years. It is recommended that elementary curriculum be changed to incorporate more international studies in earlier grades. Descriptors: Area Studies, Attitude Change, Cross Cultural Studies, Cultural Education

Titus, Dale N. (1997). Transformation of Russian Education: Decentralization, Differentiation, Democratization, Humanitarization. A two-week exchange lectureship at the Russian Diplomatic Academy in Moscow is described by the American exchange professor. The focus of the lectureship was the vital role which public education has played historically in shaping the United States. The lectures were designed around three main themes in American education: historic purposes (religious, political, social, economic), governance, and relationships among American society, culture, and education. The project also included a visit to a Russian school specializing in teaching English and to education ministries in order to conduct comparative research in conjunction with the lectureship. Some findings were: recent social and economic changes in Russia have impacted teachers adversely, due to underfunding of education, resulting in overcrowded classrooms, slow growth of teachers' salaries, a general teachers shortage, and a loss of prestige for the teaching profession. Also, new legislation has made general education compulsory and a right guaranteed by the constitution. Tuition free higher education, with competitive admission based on merit, is provided at government institutions, and as a result, private evening schools have opened to supplement basic education.   [More]  Descriptors: Compulsory Education, Educational Environment, Educational History, Elementary Secondary Education

Safilios-Rothschild, Constantina (1975). Sex Role Socialization Patterns in Selected Societies. This document evolved because studies concerning sex role socialization patterns were available from only a limited number of societies. In addition to examining available research findings, the author develops a number of relevant hypotheses with respect to several selected societies–the United States, Russia, Greece, India, and Eastern Europe. These hypotheses are: (1) equalitarian ideologies superimposed by the state may increase the range of women's educational and occupational options but may have little effect on sex role socialization and the degree of sex stereotyping; (2) same-sex play groups that provide girls with competitive experiences as well as acceptance and prestige for winning and/or mixed-sex friendship groups that replace dating, singly or in combination, can enable girls to develop intellectually and to achieve highly without fear of loss of femininity and popularity; (3) in societies in which there are formalized institutionalized patterns of sex role socialization and sex discrimination, there is no need for informal indirect, and disguised sex discrimination.   [More]  Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies, Females, Identification (Psychology), Sex Role

Robinson, Dindy (1996). World Cultures through Art Activities. The guide is intended to be a supplement to multicultural units in primary grades. The activities are freehand and students should be encouraged to use their imaginations and ideas to improve on a design. The approach is based on a whole language philosophy of learning with simple art activities that encourage creativity and critical thinking in students. The topics have been chosen on the basis of their identification with a particular country or region, its uniqueness, and suitability of artistic representation. The topics are: China, Japan, India, Australia, Africa, Israel, Egypt, Russia, France, the Netherlands, Italy, Greece, the British Isles (England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland), Scandinavia (Denmark, Sweden, Iceland, Norway, Finland), Mexico, Native Americans, and Hawaii.  Historical and factual information with a list of references sources, are included with the activities to aid the teacher in presenting topics to students. A complete list of materials, which are inexpensive and easily obtained, is provided for each activity. In many cases, activities in one chapter can be easily applied to another, such as the making of relief maps. In some cases, several variations of an activity are given to allow for different age levels or classroom environments. Descriptors: African Culture, American Indian Culture, Art, Art Activities

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