Bibliography: Russia (page 128 of 140)

This bibliography is selected and organized by the Russia is NOT the Enemy website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Larry Cuban, David Purpel, L. D. Yasnikova, Thomas Robert Hopkins, Rockville Montgomery County Public Schools, ALEX P. HARSHENIN, Ottawa (Ontario). Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, M. V. Kabatchenko, Kevin Ryan, and N. N. Solovjeva.

Ray, Charles K. (1973). Alaskan Native Education: An Historical Perspective. Research and Evaluation Report Series No. 18-A. Designed to help Alaskan Native communities and organizations, State and Federal officials, citizens of Alaska, and professional educators in dealing with changing educational situations, the report provides a reliable and succinct history of Alaskan education from the time of the area's purchase from Russia in 1867. One of the major problems in Alaskan education has been its dual school system. The major impediment to the unification of these systems has been and remains a financial one. The 14 appendices, which comprise the majority of the document, cover: 1950 information about Alaskan Native Service Education activities; the 1970 agreement between Alaska and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) for the administration of Johnson-O'Malley funds; 1970 plans for the transfer of Federal schools to the State; 1954 information relative to financing contract schools; 1966 plans for rural Alaskan education; background on the William E. Beltz Vocational School (Nome); the 1971 Northwest Alaska Education Planning Project Proposal; the 1972 BIA Manual for education through Indian organization; a 1970 White House release rejecting the policy of termination in Indian affairs; and BIA schools transferred to the State.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, American Indians, Change Strategies, Contracts

Grotberg, Edith H. (1995). The International Resilience Project: Promoting Resilience in Children. The International Resilience Project was intended to determine the multidimensional, reciprocal, and dynamic factors–and relationships of factors–that parents, teachers, caregivers, and children themselves use to promote resilience in children. The samples were 589 children and their caregivers from 14 countries: Lithuania, Russia, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Brazil, Thailand, Vietnam, Hungary, Taiwan, Namibia, Sudan, Canada, South Africa, and Japan. The ages of the children coincided with the first two of Erikson's developmental stages. Fifteen situations were developed, and adults and children's responses were measured. The major findings include the following: (1) resilience-promoting behavior is consistent with the familiarity of a situation; (2) younger children have a lower frequency of resilience-promoting responses than do older children or adults; (3) reports of a personal experience correlated with a higher percentage of resilience responses; and (4) more than half the responses showed no or only partial use of resilience factors. (Checklists for children's perceptions of resilience are included, and demographic data from 14 countries are appended.)   [More]  Descriptors: Adults, Age Differences, Child Caregivers, Child Psychology

Federal Interagency Committee on Education, Washington, DC. (1978). Toward an Action Plan: A Report on the Intergovernmental Conference on Environmental Education. A Paper Developed by the Subcommittee on Environmental Education. This is a summary of the proceedings of the recent United Nations intergovernmental conference on environmental education held in Tbilisi, Russia. This report characterizes the attitudes of those who attended regarding environmental education and their preparations and perspectives for the conference. The efforts of UNESCO/UNEP for and during the conference are also described. Sections of the publication include introduction, the intergovernmental conference, pre-conference preparations, the conference sessions, highlights of the recommendations, and two appendices. Appendix A is the accepted final statement of the conference entitled "Declaration of the Tbilisi Intergovernmental Conference on Environmental Education." Appendix B is a summary outline of the 41 conference recommendations. Recommendations involve the role of environmental education, strategies for environmental education development nationally, and international and regional cooperation. The recommendations are intended to provide a baseline for future planning leading to an international plan of action for environmental education. Several recommendations were aimed at the UFESCO/UNEP role in environmental education.   [More]  Descriptors: Communication (Thought Transfer), Conference Reports, Conferences, Developed Nations

Steinbrink, John E. (1970). Comparative Rural Landscapes: A Conceptual Geographic Model. The geography unit is designed for use in upper elementary grades. The unit objective is to help the student learn facts about the landscapes of the United States, the Netherlands, Australia, Russia, and Central Africa, and acquire generic ideas which he can apply to the analysis and comparison of other landscapes. The unit is an attempt to apply David P. Ausubel's concept of advance organizers to an elementary social studies unit. During the first three days of the unit, a conceptual rural landscape model is taught as the advance organizer. The following inclusive organizing model concepts are identified and developed: population, density, culture, earth complex (land, climate, vegetation), and technology. Specific informational data within this general framework is then presented in each case study. Through questioning techniques the teacher leads the student through an analysis of the data. Among the 18 units outlined are the following: 1) the family farm in the United States; 2) the Netherlands; high population density and extensive sheep stations; 4) the earth complex of the U.S.S.R.; huge and cold; and 5) Ituri Pygmies: subsistence hunters and gatherers in Central Africa. An overview, a list of terms used, an outline of unit ideas, and course content including diagrams, pie charts, graphs, tables, maps, and questions are provided for each unit.   [More]  Descriptors: Advance Organizers, Agriculture, Case Studies, Course Content

Prokof'ev, M. A. (1969). Narodnoe obrazovanie v SSSR 1917-1967 (Public Education in the USSR 1917-1967). This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a book on the present state of Soviet education, with historical background for purposes of comparison. The introductory chapter traces the progress of Soviet education from 1917 to 1967. Comparative statistics are quoted to illustrate the results of the revolution that have taken place in the half century of Soviet rule. In Czarist Russia, about 75% of the population was illiterate, whereas according to the 1959 census, 97.8% of those in the 9-49 groups are literate today. Many other statistics are presented to show the benefits of compulsory free education in elementary schools, evening schools, secondary schools, and institutions of higher learning. There are chapters on preschool training, secondary general polytechnical schools, curriculum development, young Communist organizations, teachers, teacher training, educational principles and techniques, vocational and technical education, and the state of public education in each of the republics of the USSR. The numbers of students enrolled in various schools are given for comparisons for the years 1914/15–10 1/2 million; 1940/41–47 1/2 million; 1945/46–37 1/2 million; 1966/67–73 1/2 million. Descriptors: Abstracts, Adult Education, Communism, Educational History

Cuban, Larry (1976). Urban School Chiefs Under Fire. This study examines three veteran urban school superintendents who were highly respected by their colleagues but who came under intense pressure from forces outside the school systems in the 1960's. Chapter 1 explores the context of the desegregation controversy and the furor over an independent evaluation that faced Benjamin C. Willis in Chicago. The second chapter describes Carl Hansen's responses in Washington, D.C. to federally funded efforts to change the public schools and sharp pressure to desegregate. San Francisco is the focus of the third chapter, in which a curricular fracas triggered by news of Russia's launching of the Sputnik and a concerted drive to desegregate the schools are examined as two instances of pressure that confronted Harold Spears. Chapter four compares and contrasts the three political contexts, school organizations, and pressure groups. The origin and development of the urban superintendency during tha last century is investigated in chapter five, in order to determine how big city school men have perceived their roles. The final chapter presents several theories to clarify further the responses of the three school superintendents examined in the study. Descriptors: Case Studies, Educational Administration, Educational History, Educational Problems

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation. (1995). Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators. This third edition of "Education at a Glance" presents a set of 49 international education indicators covering the 1991-92 school year. The publication of this set of indicators marks the completion of efforts begun in 1992 to develop a system for collecting, screening, and processing education statistics that would bring together statistical information of a very diverse nature from several sources. In addition to information on the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the report presents information on the four non-OECD countries of the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Russia. Indicators are presented in the following categories: (1) contexts of education; (2) costs, resources, and school processes; (3) results of education; and (4) annotated charts of education systems. These international figures confirm the economic importance and size of modern education systems and the volume of resources invested. Many similarities can be noted among OECD member countries, particularly in the areas of gender differences in earnings at the same level of education and in teacher salaries. Over 120 charts and graphs illustrate the discussion. Five appendixes (annexes) provide supplemental information on data sources and data technical quality.   [More]  Descriptors: Context Effect, Cooperation, Data Analysis, Data Collection

Hopkins, Thomas Robert (1959). Educational Provisions for the Alaskan Natives Since 1867. The study compiles and records the history of the administration of education for Alaskan natives since the United States purchased the territory from Russia in 1876. Chapter 1, An Overview of the Development of the Alaskan Native, covers the development of missionary and government schools, the growth and development of Native education from 1906 to 1931, and the intervention of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Chapter 2, Curriculum Problems, explains missionary, reindeer and relocation influences, Native arts and crafts, health and sanitation needs, and bilingual influences. The Administrative Structure of Alaskan Native Education Under the Bureau of Indian Affairs, chapter 3, describes the administrative and supervisory structure prior to 1931 and since 1931, educational objectives for Alaskan Native education, the administrative functions of the Alaska BIA branch, and the legal status of the Alaskan Native. The report emphasizes that, in considering Native education in Alaska, the unique influences which are not found in other States, such as a vast land area, extreme temperatures, travel difficulties, and cultural differences, must be considered. Descriptors: Administrative Organization, American History, American Indians, Bilingualism

Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. (). Social Studies Secondary Curriculum Guide on Russian History. World History Series. Bulletin No. 258. This guide outlines a nine to eighteen week course of study for secondary level students on the history of Russia and the Soviet Union. The course teaches the concepts of change and continuity, cause and effect, structural complexity, societal interdependence, freedom and obligation, human needs and cultural functioning, and national behavior patterns. Suggested teaching techniques include the use of readings, audio-visuals, classroom discussion, debates, lectures, and student research and reports. The guide treats five major topics: (1) the origins of the Russian people as a matter of historical speculation, (2) the formative years of the Russian nation and the development of autocracy, (3) the Russian autocracy's retention and consolidation of power while withstanding great stresses and strains, (4) the failure of Russian autocracy to accommodate itself to change, and (5) the confronting of the world by the Soviet Union as a great and changing nation which still holds to the continuity of the past. Behavioral objectives, suggested activities and procedures, resource materials, and evaluation techniques are provided for each topic. A bibliography of basic texts and other references and a list of periodicals, films, filmstrips, maps, tapes and transparencies for Russian history are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Area Studies, Bibliographies, Class Activities, Communism

Kabatchenko, M. V.; Yasnikova, L. D. (1990). Eradicating Illiteracy in the USSR. Literacy Lessons. The eradication of illiteracy in Russia has a lengthy history but a systematic literacy campaign began only after the revolution of 1917. The literacy problem was considered to be solved two decades later. Success was due to the following factors: (1) illiterate people were eager to learn; (2) the eradication of illiteracy and preparation for general education were carried on simultaneously; (3) radical social and economic changes were taking place, the campaign had a nationwide character; and (4) teachers were trained to teach reading and writing to all nationalities. In the early 18th century, Peter the Great introduced the Cyrillic alphabet and opened the first public schools. In the second half of the 19th century, the peasants' school system expanded and distance education appeared. However, the demand for education could not be satisfied because the tsarist government deliberately restrained cultural development. In the beginning of the 20th century, only about 22 percent of Russians were literate. In 1918-20, schools increased by 13,000 and 2 million more students enrolled. It was extremely urgent to eradicate technical illiteracy. Four-year factory and workshop schools were started in 1921. By 1939, the USSR literacy rate had reached 81.2 percent. Since then, literacy efforts have been concentrated in rural areas. People of non-Russian nationalities are illiterate in larger numbers. Women's education became a major priority after the revolution. Newly literate people received guidance as to what to read and how to take notes. Descriptors: Adult Education, Basic Skills, Continuing Education, Educational History

Solovjeva, N. N. (1970). Bibliography as a Means of Education. Recommendatory bibliography gives considerable assistance to education in Russia. The term "recommendatory" was introduced before the Revolution by the well-known bibliographer, N.A. Rubakin. The term has been preserved but the volume and contents of its concept have changed and become more complicated. During the first years of Soviet power recommendatory bibliography helped wipe out illiteracy and cultural backwardness in the rural population, often substituting for school and teacher. Now it promotes knowledge in conjunction with secondary and higher schools or becomes the foundation of post-school education of the Soviet people. The system of recommendatory bibliography handbooks embraces the most urgent themes, problems and branches of knowledge, that arouse wide social interest and meet the most typical requirements of the Soviet people in the field of general education. Manuals of recommendatory bibliography give more detailed information on books than any other sources of mass information. The main general principle of recommendatory bibliography is strict selection of good quality literature easily understood by readers. A Lenin State Library study shows that the recommendatory bibliography increases book demands in libraries and promotes general spiritual development of readers.   [More]  Descriptors: Bibliographies, Books, Education, Educational Resources

HARSHENIN, ALEX P. (1967). ON RUSSIAN IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS OF WESTERN CANADA. ALTHOUGH THE ENROLLMENT IN COURSES IN UKRANIAN IN WESTERN CANADA'S SECONDARY SCHOOLS CONTINUES TO INCREASE NORMALLY, THE DEMAND FOR RUSSIAN DECLINES PROGRESSIVELY. FACTORS AFFECTING THE ENROLLMENT TRENDS ARE (1) THE UNDERSTANDABLE PREFERENCE OF THE PREDOMINANTLY UKRANIAN POPULATION OF THE PRAIRIE STATES TO STUDY THEIR PARENT TONGUE, (2) THE LOCAL SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS' JUSTIFIED RELUCTANCE TO IMPLEMENT AS AN ELECTIVE A SUBJECT THAT HAS SUCH A MARKED INADEQUACY OF QUALIFIED TEACHERS, AND (3) THE PRIORITY GIVEN TO THE STUDY OF ENGLISH AND FRENCH AS THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGES OF CANADA. NEVERTHELESS, RUSSIA, BECAUSE OF ITS GEOGRAPHIC PROXIMITY, IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT TO CANADA. BECOMING INCREASINGLY MORE SIGNIFICANT ARE (1) FISHING, TRADING, AND TRAVEL CONTACTS, (2) THE VOLUME OF RUSSIAN RESEARCH, (3) THE NEED FOR EXCHANGE OF KNOWLEDGE AND PERSONS, AND (4) THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG CANADIANS TO COMBINE A KNOWLEDGE OF RUSSIAN WITH OTHER FIELDS OF ENDEAVOR. IF THE STUDY OF THE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE IS TO BECOME REALISTICALLY MORE ATTRACTIVE AT THE SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL, THERE MUST BE A COMPLETE REVISION OF THE PROGRAM, APPROACH, AND RELATED MATERIALS AS WELL AS AN IMMEDIATE ATTEMPT TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND INCREASE THE NUMBER OF ADEQUATELY TRAINED TEACHERS.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingualism, Curriculum Problems, Elective Courses, Enrollment Trends

Purpel, David, Ed.; Ryan, Kevin, Ed. (1976). Moral Education…It Comes with the Territory. This book contains many general and specific suggestions on how schools might deal with moral education. School personnel need to be aware and knowledgeable of the dimensions of moral education–helping people to deal with questions of right and wrong in the ways they treat each other. Most of the theoretical issues presented in the book are concerned less with basic philosophical and metaphysical questions and have more concern with rationales and frameworks for curriculum content, instructional emphasis, and organizational climates for school programs. Part I of the book offers chapters which provide a philosophical framework to moral education and which discuss the aims and methods of moral education in China, Russia, England, and the United States. It also contains two chapters on moral education in the hidden curriculum and on instructional issues. Part II contains descriptions and critiques of the values clarification approach to moral education. Part III is concerned with the cognitive-developmental approach and Part IV with the cognitive approach. A postscript deals with questions of action implementation. Descriptors: Cognitive Development, Comparative Education, Course Content, Curriculum Development

Neff, Bonita Dostal (1993). Emerging Public Relations in the Commonwealth of Independent States: An Academic Perspective. Public relations may be emerging in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), but the preparedness of public relations professionals in the United States is minimal. In a review of the status of intercultural exchange, three levels were examined in terms of the public relations situations: (1) opportunity for cultures to make contact; (2) the understanding of face-to-face assumptions; and (3) the opportunities for training. Although the CIS (formerly Russia) has moved toward more openness, the unstable economic climate is not conducive to frequent contacts. Also, knowledge of CIS culture is minimal. Very few public relations students and professionals have a background in multicultural and/or international aspects–a national survey of curriculum revealed few courses offered.  Textbooks, whether in public relations or international and multicultural areas simply do not cover Russian culture. The training for the skills needed to work in the CIS culture is relatively nonexistent. Public relations professionals and students need to acknowledge the rapidly changing world and move toward a more proactive stance on international and multicultural training. (Contains 16 references and a figure illustrating comparative differences among cultures.)   [More]  Descriptors: Cultural Differences, Foreign Countries, Higher Education, Intercultural Communication

Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa (Ontario). (1969). Indians of British Columbia (An Historical Review). An historical review is presented of the 6 major groups of Indians of the coastal region of British Columbia: the Coast Salish, Nootka, Kwakiutl, Bella Coola, Tsimshian, and Haida. Characteristics of each tribe are contrasted in the following 7 sections of the review: (1) Introduction–the life style, sociocultural factors, and unique characteristics; (2) Explorers and Traders (1774-1849)–the influence of the numerous expeditions of noted explorers and traders from Spain, England, Russia, and the United States; (3) The Colonial Period–colonization of the area due to fur trapping and gold mining; (4) The Missionaries–the Christianization and education of the natives of British Columbia; (5) The Post-confederation Period–Indian lands come under control of British Columbia's government; (6) Education–transfer of responsibility for Indian education from the missionaries to the government; and (7) Economic Development–use by Indians of their nature skills and resources to sustain a livelihood. A brief bibliography and a short description of the Indian population are included. Descriptors: American Indians, Area Studies, Art Expression, Career Choice

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