Bibliography: Russia (page 129 of 140)

This annotated bibliography is curated specifically for the Russia is NOT the Enemy website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Margaret Tejerizo, John S. Morton, Bill Gordh, Pretoria (South Africa). Human Sciences Research Council, Providence Brown Univ, Washington Forum Inst, ALFRED C. AARONS, GA. Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games, George V. Boyle, and Stephanie Prescott.

Marting, Diane (1977). Love's Pain: Anna Akhmatova and Sexual Politics. Poems written by Anna Akhmatova, the major woman writer in Russia in the first half of the twentieth century, are presented and discussed in this paper. In a brief overview of Akhmatova's work, it is noted that she was vitally concerned with the expression of her experience as a woman poet and a lover, and that she portrayed both male lovers and husbands in negative ways. Poems are then explicated to show Akhmatova's treatment of her major themes. Among the poems dealt with are "The Guest," a version of the story of don Juan, which shows the powerlessness of don Juan's women; a poem in which marriage is seen as confining; "Lot's Wife," in which Lot is seen as an obsessed being and as ignorant of the inner world of the woman narrator; a poem in which Akhmatova appears to grapple with the eventuality of her own eclipse and the rise of other women poets; "Epigram," in which women artists are perceived as threats or annoyances; and "To Poetry," which encapsulates Akhmatova's treatment of her most common poetic themes-poetry, women poets, love, and male lovers-and her differing attitudes and expectations regarding men and women. A bibliography of Akhmatova's works in translation is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Females, Foreign Countries, Literary Criticism, Males

Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria (South Africa). (1984). The Use of Radio and Television in Education and Training. Report of the Main Committee of the HSRC Education Research Programme. This report describes the findings of a work committee on learning needs and media utilization, which conducted an investigation of: (1) the learning needs that exist at the macrolevel in South Africa in informal, formal, and nonformal education; (2) those needs that can be satisfied by the use of educational radio (ER) and educational television (ETV); (3) the use of ER and ETV in selected foreign countries; and (4) the structures for control of ER and ETV in selected countries. Following a description of the priority learning needs in southern Africa, the use of ER and ETV is described for Great Britain, Germany, the Netherlands, Japan, Israel, India, Asia, Pakistan, Russia, Poland, and a number of African countries. Additional chapters discuss some important considerations in the introduction of an effective educational broadcasting service and an analysis of the current situation with regard to radio, television, and educational media in South Africa. The appendix includes a summary of the limitations and potential of ER and ETV. Descriptors: Educational Radio, Educational Television, Foreign Countries, Needs Assessment

Wu, Wei; And Others (1995). Professional Roles of Russian and U.S. Journalists: A Comparative Study. A study took an inside look at communicators from Russia and the United States to identify some of the factors that may influence journalists from both countries. Through joint efforts of researchers from both countries, two comparable nationwide surveys were conducted almost simultaneously in the summer and fall of 1992. The study was designed to answer the following research questions: Which roles are rated more or less important by 1,000 Russian and 1,156 U.S. journalists?; What are the major predictors of these ratings of various professional roles by Russian and U.S. journalists?; and Do they differ? If yes, how? In terms of method, the study is a secondary analysis of data collected in the two surveys. Besides frequencies and crosstab analyses to examine different groups' perceptions of professional roles, the study also tried to identify statistically significant predictors of journalists' perceptions of their roles in both countries. Results, show that Russian journalists rank their role as political agenda-setter 12 times as high as do American journalists, whereas American journalists rank the role of government investigator much higher than do Russian journalists. Further, neither Russian nor American journalists see themselves as adversarial, arrogant, or meddlesome. Also, feedback from audience is an important determinant of what roles journalists cast themselves in in both countries. (Contains 5 tables of data and 43 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Agenda Setting, Audience Awareness, Comparative Analysis, Foreign Countries

Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games, GA. (1994). The Olympic Spirit: A Worldwide Connection, Volume II, 1993-94 Curriculum Guide. Olympic Day in the Schools. This curriculum guide focuses on cultural awareness for students in grades K-8 through studying participants in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta (Georgia). The program explores the cultures of 20 countries through the eyes of an Olympic athlete. Volume 2 consists of two parts. Part 1 has five chapters with learning activities; those chapters include: (1) The Individual; (2) The Family; (3) Neighborhood/Community; (4) Region; and (5) Cross Cultural Comparisons. Part 2 gives country and athlete information on the participant countries of: (1) Algeria; (2) Argentina; (3) Australia; (4) Belgium; (5) Brazil; (6) Canada; (7) Chile; (8) Costa Rica; (9) England; (10) Germany; (11) Israel; (12) Italy; (13) Japan; (14) Kenya; (15) The Netherlands; (16) Nigeria; (17) Norway; (18) Panama; (19) Russia; and (20) Thailand. The materials were designed to be integrated into existing programs with the 20 countries featured because they are currently included in the curriculum of many elementary and middle schools throughout Georgia. The variety of activities is to promote learning in all areas of study. The activities are intended to develop knowledge and stimulate critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making skills. An Appendix contains a glossary of geography terms, recipes, music education resources, bibliography, materials/resources, and reviews of the 1994 Winter Olympic Games and the Paralympics. Descriptors: Athletics, Cross Cultural Studies, Curriculum Guides, Elementary School Curriculum

AARONS, ALFRED C. (1965). SPECIAL FLES ISSUE OF "THE FLORIDA FL REPORTER.". HOPEFUL OF SEEKING MUCH-NEEDED SOLUTIONS TO FLES PROBLEMS, "THE FLORIDA FL REPORTER" DEVOTED ITS FALL 1965 ISSUE TO A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. HIGHLIGHTED ARE ARTICLES (1) BY FILOMENA AND GUILLERMO DEL OLMO ON A 6-PHASED APPROACH TO THE TEACHING OF STRUCTURE THAT MIGHT HELP SOLVE THE ARTICULATION PROBLEM, (2) BY THEODORE ANDERSSON ON THE RELATIONS OF FLES TO BILINGUALISM, (3) BY SYLVIA H. ROTHFARB ON A SUMMER INSERVICE FLES PROGRAM, (4) BY EARLE RANDALL ON FLES PROGRESS, (5) BY PAUL DICKSON ON FOREIGN LANGUAGES IN EUROPEAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS, AND (6) BY FREDERICK D. EDDY ON THE SOUNDS OF LANGUAGE. ALSO SIGNIFICANT ARE THE REASONS FOR FLES AS CITED IN AN ABSTRACT OF AN ARTICLE BY MILDRED R. DONOGHUE. INCLUDED IN BRIEF NOTES ARE REFERENCES TO SLOW LEARNING, OUR STAKE IN FLES, ENGLISH STUDY BY 8-YEAR-OLDS IN GERMANY AND RUSSIA, AND A LIST OF USEFUL FLES MATERIALS. THIS SPECIAL ISSUE OF "THE FLORIDA FL REPORTER" WAS VOLUME 4, NUMBER 1, FALL 1965.   [More]  Descriptors: Articulation (Education), Bilingualism, Comparative Education, Curriculum Problems

Schug, Mark C.; Lopus, Jane S.; Morton, John S. (1997). From Plan to Market: Teaching Ideas for Social Studies, Economics, and Business Classes. This packet of lessons focuses on the transition from a legacy of central planning to a market orientation in the economic systems of Central and Eastern Europe, the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union, and China. These lessons seek to provide high school teachers with a well-informed approach to teaching about this transition. The lessons emphasize the complex texture of events and the regional distinctions found among the transition economies. The materials also highlight findings about certain conditions that seem crucial to economic reform and introduce economic concepts that teachers and students can use to describe and explain the successes and the failures of economic change. The ten lessons include: (1) "The Legacy of Soviet Communism"; (2) "Different Paths to Reform: Case Studies of Poland, China, and Russia"; (3) "Political and Economic Freedoms"; (4) "How To Privatize?"; (5) "Monopoly Is Not Just a Game"; (6) "Why Trade?"; (7) "Why Middlemen Matter: The Role of Financial Institutions in a Market Economy"; (8) "Resisting the Siren Song of Inflation"; (9) "Brother, Can You Spare a Ruble?"; and (10) "Distribution of Income: Different Ways to Slice the Pie." The appendix contains selected world development indicators for the regions under study. Descriptors: Business Education, Consumer Education, Developing Nations, Economic Change

Forum Inst., Washington, DC. (1983). Organizations Involved in Soviet-American Relations. Handbook. Non-governmental U.S. organizations involved in U.S.-USSR studies and exchange activities are described. A total of 187 groups identified as being engaged to some degree in Soviet-American work were sent questionnaires. The response rate was 70 percent. Descriptions of the 131 responding groups are provided in organizational profiles that comprise the major portion of the publication. Information is provided concerning organization activities involving the United States and Russia, staff time and budget devoted to U.S.-USSR activities, the nature and extent of contact between the group and Soviet organizations, and publications relating to U.S.-USSR relations. A summary analysis of the information collected is also presented. For example, 53 of the organizations are involved with exchange programs, 46 with public education, 25 with teaching and research, and 7 with national/international policy. Most work on very small budgets. The appendices contain the names and addresses of all organizations surveyed, cross references of organizations by types of activities, a report on U.S. government activities with the USSR, and the survey form. Descriptors: Budgets, Cultural Exchange, Exchange Programs, Foreign Policy

Yowell, Brenda (1995). The World at Our Fingertips. The goals of this telecommunications project are for students to: (1) gain a better understanding about the world and its people by communication with other students from other countries; (2) learn to use telecommunications for electronic mail and online research; (3) use higher-level thinking skills in preparing research papers and presentations; and (4) learn the importance of teamwork in accomplishing a task. The project involved teachers sending a message to the listserv KIDLINK which asked other countries to participate in a "key-pals" program. Participating countries included: South Africa; Norway; Finland; Denmark; Peru; Russia; Estonia; Chile; Mexico; England; Iceland; Germany; and Canada. Groups of students selected a participating country, composed messages off-line and then uploaded their messages to their foreign computer friends using the Texas Education Network (TENET). They used the communications as part of their research into that particular country. Highlights include the guidelines used for conducting this project; guidelines for establishing effective electronic communication; information on designing online projects; how to join the KIDLINK and Intercultural E-mail Classroom Connections (IECC) listservs; examples of actual electronic intercultural communications; a copy of the student message log; and recommended questions to ask computer pals.   [More]  Descriptors: Computer Mediated Communication, Computer Uses in Education, Electronic Mail, Foreign Countries

Brown Univ., Providence, RI. Thomas J. Watson, Jr. Inst. for International Studies. (1995). Defining Our Role in a Changing World: What Is America, and What Do We Want It To Be? Library Reader 1995. Choices for the 21st Century Education Library Series. This reader provides background information for a public policy discussion program about the nation's future at this critical point in history. Through a non-partisan discussion format, citizens are encouraged to deliberate about the direction in which the nation should head in the years to come. This reader employs a multi-disciplinary approach and a humanities-centered methodology. The volume includes the following chapters: (1) "The End of the Cold War: Challenges of a New Era"; (2) "Considering Four Futures"; (3) "The Search for Peace in an Age of Conflict: Debating the U.S. Role"; (4) "U.S. Trade Policy: Competing in a Global Economy"; (5) "Global Environmental Problems: Implications for U.S. Policy"; (6) "Russia's Uncertain Transition: Challenges for U.S. Policy"; (7) "U.S.  Immigration Policy in an Unsettled World"; and (8) "Charting Our Future: Balancing Priorities." A ballot for voting on the suggested course of action also is included, along with a participation evaluation form. Descriptors: Economics, Foreign Culture, Foreign Policy, Futures (of Society)

Gordh, Bill (1997). 15 Easy Folktale Fingerplays with Cross-Curricular Activities. Grades K-1. Intended for teachers and noting that folktales are a part of the oral tradition of every culture, this book presents 15 stories from many cultures that have been adapted for the "fingerplay" approach. The sequence of stories is based on the ease of sharing the fingerplay gestures with the class. Each story offers start-up ideas, as well as suggestions for expanding the fingerplays and activities to extend the stories across the curriculum. After an introduction, stories include "The Hand Fish" (United States); "The Frog Pond" (North America); "Spider and Knowledge" (West Africa/Caribbean); "Inga and the 10 Fairy Helpers" (Sweden); "The Fly's Castle" (Russia); "The Clay Teapot Takes Charge" (China); "The Honey Pot" (Middle East); "The Tomorrow Monkeys" (Brazil); "The Six Silly Cats in Calico Caps" (France); "Why the Moon Gets Smaller" (Australia); "The Stonecutter" (Japan); "The Wild Cherry Tree" (Mexico); "The Woodcutters"(Poland); "Why Spider Has Crooked Legs" (Liberia); and "Sparrow and Crow" (India). Contains a list of 30 resources on folk tales. Descriptors: Class Activities, Elementary Education, Folk Culture, Foreign Countries

Prescott, Stephanie, Ed.; And Others (1995). World History, Culture, and Geography: The Modern World. Course Models for the History-Social Science Framework, Grade 10. This resource book is designed to assist teachers in implementing California's history-social science framework at the 10th grade level. The models support implementation at the local level and may be used to plan topics and select resources for professional development and preservice education. This document provides a link between the framework's course descriptions and teachers' lesson plans by suggesting substantive resources and instructional strategies to be used in conjunction with textbooks and supplementary materials. The resource book is divided into eight units: (1) "Unresolved Problems of the Modern World"; (2) "Connecting with Past Learnings: The Rise of Democratic Ideas"; (3) "The Industrial Revolution"; (4) "The Rise of Imperialism and Colonialism: A Case Study of India"; (5) "World War I and Its Consequences"; (6) "Totalitarianism in the Modern World: Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia"; (7) "World War II: Its Causes and Consequences"; and (8) "Nationalism in the Contemporary World." Each unit contains references. Descriptors: Course Content, Culture, Geography Instruction, Grade 10

Tejerizo, Margaret, Ed. (1997). Rusistika: The Russian Journal of the Association for Language Learning, 1994-1997, Rusistika: The Russian Journal of the Association for Language Learning. This journal focuses on the teaching and learning of Russian. Selected articles include the following: "Soviet Cinema: Women's films"; "Learning and Teaching Russian"; "Russian in a Weekend?""Words Having a Religious Connotation in Russian"; "Grammar and Communication: The Ab Initio Russian Course"; "Borrowing of Foreign Words and Reflected Synonyms in the Russian Lexicon"; "Sisters on he Sinister Side: Gumilev as a Critic of Women Writers"; "Nation Building or Empire Saving: The Evolution of Russia's Thinking on Relations with the Former Soviet Republic"; "Starting Russian at University: Expectations and Reactions of Students"; "New Developments in Russian Vocabulary"; "Teaching Russian to Adults: A Range of Approaches"; "The Impact of Gorbachev's New Thinking on the Russian Language, 1985-1995"; "Russian in Estonia." Regular features include 'Reviews' and 'Notes for Contributors.' All articles are extensively referenced.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Classroom Techniques, College Students, Communicative Competence (Languages)

Boyle, George V. (1989). The Content and Functions of Labor Education in the Soviet Union. Labor unions in the U.S.S.R.–having emerged in Russia about 100 years after U.S. labor unions and been called by Lenin the "shock troops of the revolution"–do not much resemble their U.S. counterparts. Union members, including factory managers, constitute 99.3 percent of the work force, and place of employment or profession determines which of the 30 national unions workers belong to. Dues are 1 percent of wages. Local committees that formulate production norms for each 5-year plan include workers. Workers are expected to meet the 5-year plan in 4 years. Apportioned to the workers are such items as wage incentives, improved housing, rent subsidies, and space at day-care centers, hospitals, and vacation facilities at the Black Sea. Unions are to advocate for workers, but they do not fight for higher wages because wages are part of the 5-year plans and do not struggle with employers because there are so many job vacancies that employers do not give the union trouble. Trade union education, including two four-year institutions and a 5-year correspondence study option, is designed to train activists in their party responsibilities as well as to provide technical and professional education. (This information was collected during 6 weeks in the U.S.S.R. in 1984 and 1986.) Descriptors: Employer Employee Relationship, Foreign Countries, Labor Education, Labor Relations

Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA. (1995). CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1-30, 1995. These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussions, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) amusement park physics, media resources and literacy, and the war in Bosnia (June 1-2); (2) the war in Bosnia, hurricanes, the new Russia, newspaper closings, South Korea, Indianapolis 500 technology, and forces of the earth (June 5-9); (3) future fabrics, clashing ideologies of Clinton and Gingrich, Iran's nuclear future, affirmative action, California caviar, marketing strategy and target markets, and aircraft and founders of flight (June 12-16); (4) defining art, ancient customs and modern marriage, Thailand elections, worldwide voting qualifications, Kenya's economy, language of international business, charting the stars, advise and consent of presidential appointments, and democracy and media (June 19-23); (5) computer simulations, Haiti's political history, Turkey returns to Islam, Islam in the world, Benetton in Cuba, U.S.-Japan trade war, vaccines and immunization, trade pact perspectives, and the Atlantis mission (June 26-30). Descriptors: Cable Television, Class Activities, Current Events, Discussion (Teaching Technique)

Hoeplin-Phalon, Nancy, Ed. (1997). Great Decisions. 1997 Edition. This annual briefing book focuses on eight topics related to U.S. foreign policy. The essays provide an overview of the geographic area or subject of concern. The volume's introduction features a discussion of how U.S. foreign policy is made. The eight essays include: (1) "Today's Media: What Voice in Foreign Policy" (Raymond Carroll); (2) "Northeast Asia: Strategic Crossroads" (James Shinn); (3) "Russia and the U.S.: Growing Cooperation?" (Ted Hopf); (4) "Terrorism and Crime: A More Dangerous World" (David C. Morrison); (5) "European Integration: What Future for Europe and the U.S.?" (Andrew Moravcsik); (6) "Environmental Threats to Stability: The Role of Population Growth" (Gail Robinson; William Sweet); (7) "Middle East: Peace and the Changing Order" (F. Gregory Gause III); and (8) "Globalization: Workplace Winners and Losers" (Bruce Stokes). Each essay is accompanied by discussion questions, suggested readings, resource organizations, and an opinion ballot that can be returned to the Foreign Policy Association for tabulation. Descriptors: Developed Nations, Developing Nations, Diplomatic History, Foreign Countries

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