Bibliography: Russia (page 140 of 140)

This bibliography is selected and organized by the Russia is NOT the Enemy website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Ward Morehouse, Marilyn Parmantie, Anne E. Dossey, S. Tanguiane, John A. Dossey, Jane O. Swafford, K. Trutneva, V. Perevedentsev, and M. Zemtsova.

Morehouse, Ward (1971). Survey of Bibliographies and Reference Works on Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Russia and East Europe and Compilation of Bibliographies on East Asia, South Asia, and Africa South of the Sahara for Undergraduate Libraries. Final Report. The project was concerned with developing three up-to-date, accurate bibliographies on Asia and Africa as resource guides and book selection tools for undergraduate libraries. Existing bibliographies and information on newer books favorably received in journals were entered on a computer system. A preliminary, unedited, unselected bibliography was produced for each area and sent to librarians and scholars previously selected as editors who then graded the books as to their degree of importance for undergraduate libraries, eliminating approximately half of the titles. A graded draft was produced and circulated to a panel of college librarians and area specialists who added their suggestions, comments, and criticisms. The principal result of the project is the three bibliographies arranged by country, discipline, and alphabetically. In addition, the Foreign Area Materials Center developed a capability for automated handling of information. It is recommended that the bibliographies be periodically revised and updated. A related document is ED 056 937.   [More]  Descriptors: African Culture, African History, Area Studies, Asian History

Tanguiane, S.; Perevedentsev, V. (1994). Pedagogical and Scientific Criteria for Defining Environmental Content of General University Education. Environmental Education Series No. 19. It has become common to say that incorporating environmental education into general education mainly means integration of environmental content into the content of general, school, and higher education. This study attempts to identify, examine, and propose a system of criteria for rationally grounded selection of the environmental content of general education, particularly at the level of higher education. The two sets of criteria examined, educational and scientific, are shown to overlap and taken together, to complement one another. The study is intended to be theoretical and not to be used as a practical guide. Chapter 1 centers on the need to educate the general public and prevent environmentally harmful decisions. Chapter 2 gives a brief review of worldwide environmental conditions. Chapter 3 deals with a conceptual framework to determine the environmental content of general education, including the higher education level. This chapter also contains some reflections and considerations of ways and modalities of integrating the environmental dimension into general higher education. Chapter 4 is concerned with several global and regional environmental issues. Selection criteria are defined on the basis of the analysis of issues identified. A selected bibliography contains 73 entries.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Objectives, Environmental Education, Evaluation Criteria, General Education

MOREHOUSE, WARD (1967). SURVEY OF BIBLIOGRAPHIES AND REFERENCE WORKS ON ASIA, AFRICA, LATIN AMERICA, RUSSIA, AND EAST EUROPE–AND COMPILATION OF BIBLIOGRAPHIES ON EAST ASIA, SOUTH ASIA AND AFRICA SOUTH OF THE SAHARA FOR UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARIES. INTERIM REPORT, PHASE ONE. THE PURPOSE OF THE PROJECT IS TO ASSIST UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARIES IN STRENGTHENING THEIR RESOURCES ON AREAS OUTSIDE THE PERIMETER OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION USUALLY GIVEN LITTLE ATTENTION BY AMERICAN COLLEGES, WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON EAST AND SOUTH ASIA AND AFRICA SOUTH OF THE SAHARA. UNDER THE PROJECT'S FIRST PHASE, A PANEL OF LIBRARY ADVISERS WAS ESTABLISHED, AND PRELIMINARY VERSIONS OF A GUIDE TO REFERENCE MATERIALS ON NON-WESTERN EUROPEAN AREAS AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES ON EAST ASIA, SOUTH ASIA, AND AFRICA SOUTH OF THE SAHARA HAVE BEEN COMPILED BY COLLATING EXISTING BIBLIOGRAPHIES AND ADDING RECENTLY PUBLISHED ITEMS. THE BIBLIOGRAPHIES WERE PREPARED BY COMPUTERS, USING WITH SUCCESS THE DATATEXT SYSTEM FOR SOURCE DATA ENTRY. THE FINAL VERSIONS WILL BE ISSUED AFTER REVISION AND GRADING BASED ON ADVICE FROM SCHOLARS AND LIBRARIANS. INCLUDED AS AN APPENDIX IS THE REPORT OF A CONFERENCE ON THE PLACE OF NON-EUROPEAN LANGUAGE MATERIALS IN UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARIES (CHICAGO, NOVEMBER 17, 1967). TOPICS DISCUSSED BY FACULTY AND LIBRARIAN PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE THE IMPACT ON UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARIES FROM IMPROVED LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION AND INCREASING FACULTY NEEDS FOR RESEARCH MATERIALS IN NON-ENGLISH LANGUAGES. CONFERENCE RECOMMENDATIONS ON APPROPRIATE ACQUISITIONS IN THESE AREAS CONCLUDE THE REPORT. ALSO APPENDED IS A PAPER READ AT THE CONFERENCE–"SOME REFLECTIONS ON THE USE OF RUSSIAN LANGUAGE MATERIALS ON THE COLLEGE LEVEL AND DESIRABLE FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN THIS AREA," BY DOUGLAS READING.   [More]  Descriptors: Bibliographies, College Libraries, Conferences, Data Processing

Trutneva, K. (1972). Prevention of Blindness in the USSR. The booklet describes approaches used in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics to prevent blindness. It contrasts conditions prior to 1917 (300 eye doctors mainly located in large cities and 2,000 hospital beds for the 300,000 totally blind and 7,000,000 people with trachoma) with conditions in 1971 when in the Ukraine alone there were 3,000 eye doctors and 10,000 hospital beds. It discusses development of a health delivery plan in 1920 which involved mobile groups and a later stationary network of antitrachoma institutions headed by the Helmholtz Eye Diseases Research Institute. It notes functions of six scientific research ophthalmological institutes, 100 medical institutes for training medical workers, research laboratories, scientific societies, and institutions such as children's eye hospitals. Glaucoma, which causes blindness, and nearsightedness, which leads to eye disabilities are cited as problems, preventions noted are examinations of the over-40-year old population and attention to favorable conditions for visual work. Children are said to receive eye examinations in preschool and schools. Research on eye damage is seen to have resulted in safety and sanitary measures in factories and on farms with subsequent reduction of eye damage by a factor of six. Mentioned among achievements are a state standard on protective eyeglasses, methods of locating alien bodies in the eye, treatment of eye burns, and new methods of surgery such as ultra sound surgery. (Photographs are included that show techniques used in ophthalmology.)   [More]  Descriptors: Delivery Systems, Diseases, Exceptional Child Services, Foreign Countries

Dossey, John A., Ed.; Swafford, Jane O., Ed.; Parmantie, Marilyn, Ed.; Dossey, Anne E., Ed. (1997). Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (19th, Bloomington-Normal, IL, October 18-21, 1997). Volume 1. This conference proceedings volume for PME-NA-XIX contains a total of 87 reports: one plenary session report; 39 research reports; 20 short oral reports; 25 poster session reports; and two discussion group reports. Only the plenary and research reports are full reports; the others are generally one-page abstracts. The full reports include: (1) "Participation as Fundamental in Learning Mathematics" (James G. Greeno); (2) "An Undergraduate Student's Understanding and Use of Mathematical Definitions in Real Analysis" (Barbara S. Edwards); (3) "Mis-Generalization in Calculus: Searching for the Origins" (David E. Meel); (4) "Students' Cognitive Approaches to the Concept of Rate" (Rodolfo Oliveros and Manuel Santos-Trigo); (5) "Effects of Different Instructional Approaches on Calculus Students' Understanding of the Relationship between Slope, Rate of Change, and the First Derivative" (Donald T. Porzio); (6) "The Process of Periodicity" (Gilli Shama and Nitsa Movshovitz-Hadar); (7) "The Relationship between Written and Verbal Performances: A Study of First Year Calculus Students' Understanding of the Derivative" (Kathleen G. Snook); (8) "Mathematical Patterns in the Middle Grades: Symbolic Representations and Solution Strategies" (Joyce Wolfer Bishop); (9) "The Relationship of Undergraduates' Beliefs about Learning Algebra and Their Choice of Reasoning Strategies for Solving Algebra Problems" (Albert D. Otto, Cheryl A. Lubinski, and Carol T. Benson); (10) "Teachers' Beliefs and Student Failure in Algebra" (Daniel K. Siebert); (11) "Mandated Assessment Instruments: How Do Teachers Value Them?" (Karen Bell and Thomas J. Cooney); (12) "Using Assessment Practices as a Tool for Changing Teaching Methodology" (Daniel J. Brahier); (13) "A Proposed Method for Assessing Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge" (Janet Warfield); (14) "Assessing Student Work: The Teacher Knowledge Demands of Open-Ended Tasks" (Linda Dager Wilson and Patricia Ann Kenney); (15) "Mathematical Activities in Insurance Agents' Work" (Judit Moschkovich); (16) "A Semiotic Framework for Linking Cultural Practice and Classroom Mathematics" (Norma C. Presmeg); (17) "Educating Non-College Bound Students: What We Can Learn from Manufacturing Work" (John P. Smith, III); (18) "Probability Instruction Informed by Children's Thinking" (Graham A. Jones, Carol A. Thornton, and Cynthia V. Langrall); (19) "Student Understanding of Statistics: Developing the Concept of Distribution" (Melissa Mellissinos, Janet E. Ford, and Douglas B. McLeod); (20) "A Snapshot of Developmental Algebra Students' Concept Images of Function" (Phil DeMarois); (21) "Preservice Teachers' Cognitive Approaches To Variables and Functions" (David B. Klanderman); (22) "The Development of Students' Notions of Proof in High School Classes Using Dynamic Geometry Software" (Enrique Galindo with Gudmundur Birgisson, Jean-Marc Cenet, Norm Krumpe, and Mike Lutz); (23) "Understanding Angle Ideas by Connecting In-School and Out-of-School Mathematics Practice" (Joanna O. Masingila and Rapti De Silva); (24) "Defining an Exterior Angle of Certain Concave Quadrilaterals: The Role of 'Supposed Others' in Making a Mathematical Definition" (Yoshinori Shimizu); (25) "Problem-Centered Learning and Early Childhood Mathematics" (Noel Geoghegan, Anne Reynolds, and Eileen Lillard); (26) "Similarities and Differences of Experienced and Novice K-6 Teachers after an Intervention: The Use of Students' Thinking in the Teaching of Mathematics" (Cheryl A. Lubinski, Albert D. Otto, Beverly S. Rich, and Rosanna Siongco); (27) "Learning and Teaching Grade 5 Mathematics in New York City, USA, and St. Petersburg, Russia: A Descriptive Study" (Frances R. Curcio and Natalia L. Stefanova); (28) "Some Results in the International Comparison of Pupils' Mathematical Views" (Erkki Pehkonen); (29) "Views of German Mathematics Teachers on Mathematics" (Gunter Torner); (30) "Teacher Change: Developing an Understanding of Meaningful Mathematical Discourse" (Rebekah L. Elliott and Eric J. Knuth); (31) "Group Case Studies of Second Graders Inventing Multidigit Subtraction Methods" (Karen C. Fuson and Birch Burghardt); (32) "Teaching Mathematical Procedures Mindfully: Exploring the Conditional Presentation of Information in Mathematics" (Ron Ritchhart and Ellen Langer); (33) "Generating Multiple Solutions to Mathematical Problems by Prospective Secondary Teachers" (Jinfa Cai); (34) "A Problem Solving Session Designed To Explore the Efficacy of Similes of Learning and Teaching Mathematics" (Vilma Mesa and Patricio Herbst): (35) "An Expert's Approach To Mathematical Problem-Solving Instruction" (Manuel Santos-Trigo); and (36) "Relevance Judgements in Mathematical Problem Solving" (Graeme Shirley and Martin Cooper).    [More]  Descriptors: Algebra, Cultural Influences, Educational Assessment, Elementary Secondary Education

Zemtsova, M. (1972). Education of the Blind and People with Weak Sight in the USSR. Described with accompanying photographs is education for blind and partially sighted children between 7 and 20 years of age in special residential schools in the Soviet Union. Discussed is vocational education in 120 vocational polytechnic schools for the blind and partially sighted from 1st to 11th forms (grades), sanatorium schools from 1st to 11th forms; secondary general day and correspondence schools from 3rd to 11th forms; and specialized schools. Noted are two 9-year general vocational schools for the mentally retarded and blind, a school for the deaf and blind, 1-year preschool groups, and preschools for 3- to 6-year-old children with amblyopia. Given are details about curriculum such as emphasis on fundamentals of science, speech and sensory development, knowledge of life through personal discovery, and work in the Komosol (Communist youth group) at the secondary level. Also discussed are hours of study, transfer policies, health services, and admittance to schools based on visual acuity. Mentioned are stress on work with objects in primary forms, enrichment experiences such as hikes, use of technical devices such as radio and television, and provision for well-lighted study rooms for subjects such as physics and art at the senior form level. Students with special aptitudes are said to attend specialized general vocational schools that emphasize subjects such as music education and mathematics and to later enter into professions. Other students are said to specialize in skilled trades or agriculture (the severely visually handicapped).   [More]  Descriptors: Curriculum, Exceptional Child Education, Foreign Countries, Professional Education

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *